August 2012- Orientation Seminar

When surveying the distinct human tapestry in the teachers' lounge at the Gvanim school, near the town of Hadera, where the first instructors' meeting of the year was held in August, it was evident that the terms 'social harmony' and 'coexistence' were not just empty catch phrases or bumper sticker slogans. The multifarious group of instructors, who make up the heart of our organization, served as a living testimony to the principles advocated by Budo for Peace. The moving contrast of Baruch Frank, a new immigrant from Poland with a small crocheted yarmulke, chatting to Hanan Drawshi, a soft-spoken young woman from the village of Iksal who dons a religious Islamic head covering, is not an image to be taken for granted. Although the group is geographically and culturally scattered around the country from Abu Quidar in the south to Hoshaya in the north and even Hebron, the meeting proved that a deep seated zeal for traditional martial arts culture is not the only commonality shared by our instructors. As the instructors, both new and veteran, introduced themselves to their peers, it became ever clearer that the social labels of race, religion and gender were insignificant factors in the eyes of our senseis.



Shahak Segal was especially moved by the exhibitions of tolerance and social awareness and reception. As the principal of Pisgat Amir high school for youth at risk, Shahak has witnessed first-hand how social hardships can elicit intolerance and muffle the willingness to accept those who are different from us. Therefore, these displays of mutual respect were an unbelievable scenario of which he was proud to be a part. "Abed [Al-Karim], an Arab instructor, teaches karate at a Jewish school - it's incredible! In this room you truly feel that peace is a tangible action and not merely vacant platitudes. I would be honored if one day my kids will be able to train with Ameer from Hebron, this to me is the essence of Budo for Peace".

 

After reacquainting and learning more about each other, Uri Wolff led a rejuvenating meditation session, in which all members reflected on how they can each contribute more of themselves to promise the future growth of BFP. The final chapter of the meeting was devoted to outlining the renewed principles, standards and expectations of our instructors, young leaders and clubs. Meetings and gatherings of this kind have become a permanent monthly feature on the BFP calendar. Each seminar deepens our commitment to the three tiers which collectively form the hallmark of Budo for Peace: social unity, skilled martial arts and educational enrichment.

 

  1. Kick-starting 2012-2013

    Kick-starting 2012-2013
  2. Kick-starting 2012-2013

    Kick-starting 2012-2013
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    Kick-starting 2012-2013
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    Kick-starting 2012-2013
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    Kick-starting 2012-2013
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    Kick-starting 2012-2013
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    Kick-starting 2012-2013
  8. Kick-starting 2012-2013

    Kick-starting 2012-2013